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20110301
20110331
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington by seth jones by the rand corp. who has written extensively on the conflict. advise the general of special operations forces and afghanistan. thank you for joining me. in the last few minutes we have news from a senior government official telling the afp agency that controls and security in four promises -- provinces and three cities will be handed to afghan forces from july. you just returned from afghanistan. you think these forces are ready to take over? >> i don't think they are ready to take over in all areas. if some of the most dangerous provinces like candy bar and held land -- hellman's -- kandhar and helmand clearly not be able to take on by their own. some are much more benign and face much less of a threat from the taliban and allied forces. one of the issues is which provinces are most appropriate for transition. >> much of the issues is how you do in the ethnic makeup of the forces. i understand there is difficulty recruiting past two -- pashtun in the southern provinces. >> in the afghan national army, the percentage ofpashtun 40%. there has not been a real consen
for another year. with seth's grandparents in ohio their saving grace has been skype. >> you want mommy and dad toe play, okay. >> reporter: 2 years old and whatever comes along with that. sometimes he doesn't want to come along. they can see him, watch him play. things they would never be able to do before. >> technology has been so amazing. >> reporter: what's on your shirt, budy? >> they are lucky to be on a base with fast internet service. >> we know that a lot of families don't get that same -- excuse me, i just feel sorry for those that don't get that pleasure, you know. >> reporter: in 2001 the military divorce rate was lower than the national average. after ten years of deployments it's higher. counselors have even used skype for marital counseling during deployments. >> it can be a double-edged sword. >> reporter: kelly is an advocate for military families and also a sailor's wife who said her husband in iraq got frustrated when their daughter avoided skype. >> why doesn't she want to talk with me and we found out her way of coping with the deployment is out of sight, out of mi
at least, the arguments. we're joined by andrew smiley and seth baronswag who is a business and employment law attorney. seth, the record reflects, unfortunately, some anecdotal or individual acts of gender discrimination, but that's not enough, as you know. there has to be some systemic scrippation to support a class action. of it's what's called commonality of claims. where does that exist here? >> well, the problem is that it does not exist in this case. nobody disagrees with the point that discrimination in the workplace is horrible and intolerable. we all agree on that. can question is, in this case did these six plaintiffs adequately and commonly represent roughly a million workers in 3,500 locations throughout the united states that have undergone discrimination under the last several years through over 170 job classifications? unfortunately, i don't believe that it does. i think the supreme court will reach that conclusion. it doesn't mean that the case can't move forward, that they're not victims, it just has to be positioned properly, and that's the way it has to move forward in
by professor seth stein of northwestern university. >> this was much bigger than we expected to see on that part of the what's call the the japan trench. and one of the things we've been learning everything since 2004 was we used, before 2004 we thought we knew which piece of sub duction zones could have these really big earthquakes. the sumatra earthquake and now this one, what the earth often does, we learn to be pretty humble in the face of the complexities of the earth. the earth has the ability to surprise us. i think none of us expected that anything this big would happen there. >> rose: we continue with the president of georgia, talking about his relationship with russia and the events of 2008. >> america's main value for peoples like us, and there are many of us out there, right s that america, besides having power or economic leverage, it's also an idea t is a much bigger than than just another country. that is what makes america so strong. there is more freedomses it there in the world, it's much more pragmatic. and that's, i think there is nothing that can stop freedom. i
a lion. with deadly storms and devastating floods hitting the midwest, cbs news correspondent seth doane is in hard-hit findlay, ohio, for us this morning. seth, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, chris. yes, neighborhoods here in findlay that were once along the river now appear to be more in the river. for instance, no one will be driving 25 miles per hour on this street today. residents told us as they stood in their front windows and watched the water levels rise, tensions rose, too. how high did the water get? >> it got up to those rocks down there. >> so right in front of your house? >> yes. >> reporter: this family hauled their belongings to higher ground, just one of thousands battling the floodwaters. >> this is water from the river coming right through your basement. >> yep. the pumps are able to keep up with it now. it's not as high as it was. >> this is just a fact of life for you folks? >> it seems to be in the last four or five years. >> reporter: home is the floodprone town of findlay, ohio. it's hard hit after a violent storm put dropped warm rain on a thick snow pa
the director may have been shown the door. cbs news correspondent seth doane is in times square this morning with the very latest. seth, good morning. >> good morning, erica. that's right. opening night has changed so many times for "spider-man," that even the show's representatives are referring to it as hopening night. and the show's critics are calling it nopening night. it's a spectacle unlike anything broadway has seen before. "spider-man: turn off the dark," with its high-flying acrobatics and its record $65 million budget, is now posing a very expensive question. when will it open? the management insists that's still march 15th. >> the critics have not received their invites yet, meaning something is up. the show is not opening on march 15th. >> reporter: frank reports on broadway and his sources back up a story in "the new york times" that says the opening will be dlied by three months. >> it's going to open in june. and also, there's been talk about possibly closing the show for a little bit to tweak the show. >> reporter: on "the early show" last week, even lead actor reed carney s
forget florida, we're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti, and seth finds a really big bone. we're talking huge. they dig it up, put it in the natural history museum and we get to name it. sethasauraus. really. your points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel? means better vacations. that's incredible. believe it...with chase sapphire preferred your points are worth 25% more on travel when booked through ultimate rewards. your advertising mail campaign is paying off! business is good! it must be if you're doing all that overnight shipping. that must cost a fortune. it sure does. well, if it doesn't have to get there overnight, you can save a lot with priority mail flat rate envelopes. one flat rate to any state, just $4.95. that's cool and all... but it ain't my money. i seriously do not care... so, you don't care what anyone says, you want to save this company money! that's exactly what i was saying. hmmm... priority mail flat rate envelopes, just $4.95 only from the postal service. a simpler way to ship.
florida, we're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti, and seth finds a really big bone. we're talking huge. they dig it up, put it in the natural history museum and we get to name it. sethasauraus. really. your points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel? means better vacations. that's incredible. believe it...with chase sapphire preferred your points are worth 25% more on travel when booked through ultimate rewards. >>> more now on the remarkable day in libya and the policy and political debates over whether the united states should use military force in the crisis. david gergen and gloria borger joining us now. i want an observation from each. we've all covered dramatic stories. you have a civil war for eight hours. reporters in tripoli literally roll out a red carpet. moammar gadhafi comes into the hotel pumping his fists. he did not speak to the journalists as a group, but he was sending a defiant message there. he knows the world is debating what to do. >> that's right. and he's a nut case. he's so unpredictable. but he has bigger guns and bigger
're like forget florida, we're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti, and seth finds a really big bone. we're talking huge. they dig it up, put it in the natural history museum and we get to name it. sethasauraus. really. your points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel? means better vacations. that's incredible. believe it...with chase sapphire preferred your points are worth 25% more on travel when booked through ultimate rewards. somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier. all to become the kind of city people want to live and work in. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest questions. and the over sixty thousand people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers.
, we're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti, and seth finds a really big bone. we're talking huge. they dig it up, put it in the natural history museum and we get to name it. sethasauraus. really. your points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel? means better vacations. that's incredible. believe it...with chase sapphire preferred your points are worth 25% more on travel when booked through ultimate rewards. >>> while u.s. forces stay on the sidelines, libyan rebels and pro-gadhafi troops are fighting for control of the country. brian todd has been looking into the firepower. which side has the real advantage? >> both sides have advantages, but also very serious disadvantages. what you're looking at are two sides scrapping for every last recruit and piece of equipment to gain an edge. within intense fighting, including this battle at an airport 100 miles for the capitol, gadhafi's forces face a huge challenge. the teams on the ground have been able to give us a picture of what territories he lost and what he held onto. forces loyal to moammar gadhafi hol
're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti, and seth finds a really big bone. we're talking huge. they dig it up, put it in the natural history museum and we get to name it. sethasauraus. really. your points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel? means better vacations. that's incredible. believe it...with chase sapphire preferred your points are worth 25% more on travel when booked through ultimate rewards. >>> tonight, a dramatic effort by forces loyal to moammar gadhafi to break the stalemate in libya and break the back of the opposition. a fight in an important desert town, a fight today in which gadhafi's opponents were able to hold off government troops. [ speaking foreign language ] [ gunfire ] >> it's important to remember about what you are seeing is that according to gadhafi, these libyan fighters don't exist. he's been arguing that it's al qaeda and drugged kids behind the opposition and he claims he's not using planes against libyans, only against ammunition depots. this new video toonl for the oil port of brega, east of tripoli, seems to show oth
. >> larry king, really? >> yes. >> the situation. >> oh, my gosh, the situation. >> whoa. >> seth mcfarland was there. >> yes. it was -- >> give me some funny lines. >> i can't. i almost blocked it out of my mind. i have to say, i felt pity for donald trump. >> our next president. >> it was filthy, filthy, filthy. >> all right. >> moving on, we'll start -- i just have a question. maybe harold ford jr. can answer this. when it comes to wisconsin and the gentleman we saw screaming there asking for 24 hours for the democrats who have left the state to be given notice to come back about moving on in terms of stripping the union of their collective bargaining rights? i don't think the governor has been warm and caring here and is probably not making the right decision but it's his call. and they chose to leave the state. which is a little unusual. it's a little unusual to leave the state and not vote, right? it's a different way of protesting something, correct? is that a yes or no. >> yes, it is unusual to leave the state. >> if the republicans in turn do something unusual, who are the d
seconds left? >> the gentleman has 19 seconds left. >> do you want 19 seth -- seconds jeff? >> i would like to just for the record talk about their rig count real quickly, the rigs that are out there that are claiming in the gulf of mexico, those rigs may not be drilling. is that correct? so it doesn't do us any good to to -- drilling. >> correct. rigs could certainly be there not drilling. i can speak to the longer-term issue of how fast it could recover. >> the time of the gentleman has expired and there is a desire for second round so i will certainly recognize the gentleman. the gentleman from utah's time has expired. there is a desire for second round. i have one question of mr. holt and then finish up with mr. landry. dr. foss, there have been records that have been -- between that price differential of the world crude in the west texas and the suggestion is because this has been the rise or the impact of north dakota. and i understand that new production probably would have an impact on the world prices but is this difference in price an indication that more domestic production
discussions. i believe the answer to you. guest: i am very sorry for the loss of seth, but that is where we do not want to go. that is the kind of bullying consequence to the extreme that is really at the heart of the efforts of the national school boards association and, really, president obama in addressing bullying. you have a variety of tools as a board member. they're subject to your state law. school board is a great place to start a few -- if you can, like the state school board association. they have trainers cover resources, lawyers, policy experts. many of the people on staff are either former school board members said they have the tools to help the really address. we at the national school boards association can also help you. a program like students on board would have been very useful to your school board and we plan to introduce that, by the way, in california next month at our annual conference in san francisco. the state school board association is a great resource for you. i think you said that you were on the school board, but for those members who are now active, that is a
. your book has caused quite the controversy. >> good for you. >> it conjures up images of seth grogan sitting around playing video games and being irresponsible. >> generally juvenile behavior, yes. >> men in their 20s and 30s who are now single, at one time in history, they would have been married or on the road to being married. >> they would have been like george bailey. >> now they really have to think, well, it's way far away. i don't know how many men have told me, i don't have to marry until i'm 30 or 40. they have a little bit of money in their pockets, they're working on their careers, and they're trying to figure it out. >> do you think women are smarter and all those things? >> i think it's those things, but i think there are other things going on. we have to look at the economy. a lot of these young guys now, instead of getting married or getting jobs, they're now in graduate school, they know placement is very difficult to come by as far as work, so they have that forced extended adolescence, so there are other things going on. >> and when you think about the biology, kid
's going on out there. after the fourth trip by seth lives, you are really not helping me at all by saying that. and so, yeah, it was surprising, but i guess i shouldn't have been surprised on the other hand. >> judge walker, how much of a distraction is it for you to be involved in logistics of this? or do you get the logistics to someone else and you try to say apart from that? how do you handle that? is it different now digitally than it was a few years ago? >> taking the first question, what i have found the most helpful was trying to delegate as much as possible to other people in the court administration. unfortunately, i'm blessed with some extremely able individuals who are able to do much of the work in new interface with the media. and did all of the things i think that we've described today. so i did not have any unusual degree of administrative burden when conduct in the proposition 8 case or an another high-profile case that preceded it, although obviously in a quite different schedule and that is the cases above above international security aviation wiretapping services. but
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)